Current Research on Reflection and Engaged Learning

 

CNDLS engages in research questions relating to reflection as it is used as pedagogy and practice in college classrooms and its relationship to engagement in learning. Additionally, lines of interest emerging from two signature CNDLS programs (the Engelhard Project and the Doyle Program) that include fostering student well-being as an important factor related to engaged learning and inclusive pedagogy. With both of these programs using a curriculum-infusion approach to learning, our research also explores ways to assess for formation outcomes for students, particularly around student well-being.

Inclusive Pedagogy and Student Well-being

Some current scholarship on inclusive pedagogy and student well-being include the following research projects and publications:

  • Randy Bass, Vice Provost for Education and Professor of English, recently contributed a “Provocation” on “Well-being, Disintegration and the Re-bundling of Higher Education” to the forthcoming volume Well-Being and Higher Education: A Strategy for Change and the Realization of Education's Greater Purposes (2016), in which he argues that ….. (need description) In the same collection, Georgetown Professors Heidi Elmendorf (Biology) and Joan Riley (Nursing) contributed a chapter on the application of curriculum infusion around wellness in the sciences.

    Bass, R. (2016, forthcoming). Well-being, Disintegration and the Re-bundling of Higher Education (Ch. 34). In Well-Being and Higher Education: A Strategy for Change and the Realization of Education's Greater Purposes. Washington, DC: Bringing Theory to Practice.

    Elmendorf, H. & Riley, J. Curricular Infusion of Well-Being and Science (Ch. 22). In Well-Being and Higher Education: A Strategy for Change and the Realization of Education's Greater Purposes. Washington, DC: Bringing Theory to Practice.

  • Georgetown Professors Jen Woolard, Joan Riley, and (include others) are part of an Engelhard “Community of Inquiry” that is seeking to examine the outcome of students’ participation in Engelhard courses on students’ well-being. As part of this new research project, the faculty members have ….
  • The Engelhard Project team contributed to the recent book Transforming Undergraduate Education: Theory That Compels and Practices That Succeed, edited by Don Harward (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012). Randy Bass co-wrote a chapter with Ken Bain of Montclair State University entitled “Threshold Concepts of Teaching and Learning that Transform Faculty Practice (and the Limits of Individual Change),” while Mindy McWilliams and Joan Riley (NHS) co-wrote a chapter on “Curriculum Infusion: Educating the Whole Student and Creating Campus Change—Georgetown University."

    Bass, R. & Bain, K. (2012). Threshold concepts of teaching and learning that transform faculty practice (and the limits of individual change). In Harward, D. (Ed), Transforming Undergraduate Education: Theory that Compels and Practices that Succeed (pp. NEED PAGES). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

    McWilliams, M. & Riley, J. (2012). Curriculum infusion: Education the whole student and creating campus change--Georgetown University. In Harward, D. (Ed), Transforming Undergraduate Education: Theory that Compels and Practices that Succeed (pp. NEED PAGES). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

  • “Faculty Collaboration to Effectively Engage Diversity: A Collaborative Course Redesign Model,” an article co-written by Maureen Walsh, Joselyn Schultz Lewis, and John Rakestraw, was published in the Winter 2013 edition of Peer Review, an AAC&C publication. The article details the work of Georgetown's Doyle Faculty Fellows program and highlights the benefits of bringing faculty together from diverse disciplines as they each redesign courses to better engage themes of diversity and difference.

    Walsh, M., Schultz Lewis, J., & Rakestraw, J. (2013, Winter). Faculty collaboration to effectively engage diversity: A collaborative course redesign model. Peer Review, 15.1.

Reflection in Teaching and Assessment

Reflection in teaching is another area through which both CNDLS staff and Georgetown faculty have published scholarship, specifically in relation to reflective grading practices and the assessment of reflection in student writing. Some current scholarship on reflective teaching and assessment practices include the following projects and publications:

  • Randy Bass and CNDLS Associate Director for Assessment, Mindy McWilliams, co-presented a paper on “Reflecting on Reflective Writing Analytics: Assessment Challenges and Iterative Evaluation of a Prototype Tool” at the Learning Analytics and Knowledge Conference in Edinburgh, UK on April 25, 2016. Along with co-presenters Simon Buckingham Shum, Ágnes Sándor, Rosalie Goldsmith, and Xiaolong Wang, Randy and Mindy shared their experiences using an innovative analytics tool to assess students’ reflective writing. This ongoing research project, which is currently in development for publication, aims to examine methods for assessing student reflections and thus contributing to a larger body of scholarship around the use of reflective writing in higher education.

    Bass, R., McWilliams, M., Buckingham Shum, S., Goldsmith, R., & Wang, X. (2016, April). Reflecting on Reflective Writing Analytics: Assessment Challenges and Iterative Evaluation of a Prototype Tool. Presented at the Learning Analytics and Knowledge Conference, Edinburgh, UK.

  • Maggie Debelius published "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Assessment" in the book Re/Claiming Accountability, edited by Michelle Eble, Wendy Sharer, Tracy Morse and Will Banks (Utah State University Press, 2016). This article describes findings from The Georgetown Student Writing Study, a campus-wide writing assessment project completed in 2013.

    Debelius, M. (2016, February). A funny thing happened on the way to assessment. In Eble, M., Sharer, W., Morse, T, & Banks, W. (Eds), Re/Claiming Accountability: Improving Writing Programs through Accreditation and Large-Scale Assessments (need page #s). Boulder, CO: Utah State University Press.

  • In 2012, Mindy McWilliams, along with Jenna Felz (Fordham University) and Ana Marie Siscar (Fairfield University), edited and published an “Assessment Toolkit for Universities' Humanitarian Engagement.” This Toolkit was the result of a three-year Teagle Foundation grant to Fairfield, Fordham and Georgetown Universities to develop assessment tools and practices for the Jesuit Universities Humanitarian Action Network.

    McWilliams, M., Felz, J., & Siscar, A. M. (2012, June). JUHAN Assessment Toolkit for Universities' Humanitarian Engagement. https://www.fairfield.edu/media/cfpl_juhan_toolkit.pdf

There are other faculty that CNDLS has worked with in the area of reflective teaching, and their own body of research has contributed to SoTL scholarship, including:

  • Mark Rom, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor in the McCourt School of Public Policy, has published meaningful work reflecting on the grading biases that impact teaching practices. You can find his scholarship on this topic in the following journals:

    Rom, M. (2011). Grading More Accurately. Journal of Political Science Education, 7.2, 208-223.

    Rom, M. & Musgrave, P. (2014) Political Outcome Bias in Grading: Identifying Problems and Suggesting Solutions. Journal of Political Science Education, 10:2, 136-154, DOI: 10.1080/15512169.2014.894352

    Mark Carl Rom (2015). Numbers, Pictures, and Politics: Teaching Research Methods Through Data Visualizations, Journal of Political Science Education, 11:1, 11-27, DOI: 10.1080/15512169.2014.985108.

    Musgrave, P. & Rom, M. (2015). Fair and Balanced? Experimental Evidence on Partisan Bias in Grading. American Politics Research, 43.3, 536–554.