Resources from Recent Events

 

Most CNDLS events will appear below after they are held, along with any relevant video, presentation slides, handouts, or notes. Click on an event title to see its full description and a list of available resources.

2014

2013

  • Learning Analytics: Using Data to Guide Instruction

    Nov. 15—Presenters: Randy Bass, Matthew Carnes, Oded Meyer

    “[Learning analytics is] the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs.” – Society for Learning Analytics (SoLAR) http://www.solaresearch.org/mission/about/

    Learning Analytics from CNDLS on Vimeo.

  • Online Courses, Assessment, Certification, and Credit: The Spring Scholarly Communication Symposium

    Apr. 12—Speakers: Lori Breslow, Inna Lisker, John Rinderle

    The spring 2013 Scholarly Communication Symposium focuses on a discussion of student learning and assessment in an online environment. This comes in the context of the recent launch of a major campaign to expand Georgetown's technology-assisted learning (ITEL). This new initiative has stirred a lively discussion on campus about online learning, and particularly about models for assessment, certification, and credit in massive open online courses. Our symposium brings representatives of some key players in online education to campus, and lets them share their vision, experiences (and evidence!) with our faculty. The presentations will be followed by an open Q&A session.

2012

  • Real-time Polling and Data Analysis with Clickers

    Nov. 12—Instructors: Fr. Matthew Carnes, Assistant Professor in the Department of Government and Patrick Farace, Senior Instructional Technology Specialist at iClicker

    This workshop was for faculty and staff interested in getting the most out of clickers to create data mining opportunities.

    TLT Presentation 11/12/12: Real-Time Polling and Data Analysis with Clickers from CNDLS on Vimeo.

  • Online Learning at Georgetown: Faculty Perspectives

    Sep. 28—Instructors: Oded Meyer (Mathematics and Statistics) and Parina Patel (School of Foreign Service), Sherry Steeley (Center for Language Education and Development), and Mary Bondmass (NHS)

    This workshop featured a Panel discussion by Georgetown faculty who are experimenting with online teaching in various contexts.

    TLT Event, September 2012 from CNDLS on Vimeo.

  • Assessment and Grading

    Mar. 26—Instructors: Mindy McWilliams (CNDLS)

    This workshop explored a variety of ways to understand what and how students are learning. Why wait until the end of the semester to find out that your students didn't 'get it'? We introduced a number of techniques to use early in and midway through the semester to assess your students' true understanding of material. We also discussed topics such as rubrics and taxonomies for easy and effective grading, and accounting for prior knowledge and possible misconceptions on the part of students.

  • Syllabus Design

    Mar. 22—Instructors: John Rakestraw (CNDLS)

    This workshop discussed the fundamental components of a good syllabus as well as organizational approaches to designing one. In light of these components and approaches, the workshop discussed best practices of syllabus design through past examples.

  • Digital Stories

    Mar. 14—Instructors: Matthias Oppermann (CNDLS)

    Digital stories are multimedia projects that combine text, images, audio, video, and animation into short film clips. In recent years, digital storytelling has turned many university classrooms into spaces of creative multimedia production. Drawing on examples of student produced stories, in this workshop we explored digital storytelling as a social pedagogy that allows students to construct and represent knowledge to others in a format that differs from traditional writing assignments.

  • Non-Verbal Communication in the Classroom

    Feb. 23—Instructors: Zaydoon Jawadi

    This training workshop focused on effective instructor nonverbal communication behaviors. It aimed to heighten participants' awareness of and intensify their mastery of effective nonverbal behaviors, including body language and voice aspects such as vocal variety, eye contact, smiling, body orientation, posture, gestures, movement, and others.

  • Using Humor in the Classroom

    Feb. 15—Instructors: Joselyn Schultz Lewis (CNDLS), Andria Wisler (JUPS)

    This workshop explored the role of humor in the classroom. How can humor be harnessed to mediate conflict? How can humor become an educative tool? And how, as an educator, do you deal with divisive or unwelcome humor that may emerge during class?

  • Effective Classroom Interaction

    Feb. 13—Instructors: Joselyn Schultz Lewis (CNDLS), Janet Russell (CNDLS)

    This workshop covered various types of classroom interaction including lecture, discussion, and other activities that can be used in both small and large classes.

  • Teaching Portfolio

    Jan. 31—Instructors: John Rakestraw (CNDLS), Joselyn Schultz Lewis (CNDLS)

    This workshop explained and demonstrated how to document and reflect on the knowledge and skills gained from your teaching experience through developing a professional teaching portfolio.

  • Intro to Teaching Resources

    Jan. 26—Instructors: John Rakestraw (CNDLS), Anna Kruse (CNDLS)

    This orientation session served as a welcome and introduction to the AT Program by CNDLS and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

2011

  • Teaching Portfolio

    Nov. 9—Instructors: John Rakestraw (CNDLS), Joselyn Schultz Lewis (CNDLS)

    This workshop explained and demonstrateed how to document and reflect on the knowledge and skills gained from your teaching experience through developing a professional teaching portfolio. We will illustrate the iterative and continuing nature of portfolio construction by demonstrating the revision process used in writing and revising a teaching philosophy statement. Participants will leave the workshop with a template for building their own teaching portfolios, as well as examples to support them in writing their own teaching philosophy statement.

  • Enhancing Learning and Scholarship with Mapping Technologies

    Nov. 7—Presenter: Diana Sinton

    Across institutions of higher education, faculty and students are exploring the multiple and diverse roles that GIS and related mapping applications can play. Are they all equally interesting and worthwhile? How do they contribute to teaching and learning? Students interact with location-based services via social media and their cell phones every day, but can we connect this to their academic and professional worlds?

    slides Watch the full presentation here.

  • Difficult Discussions

    Oct. 25—Instructors: Joselyn Schultz Lewis (CNDLS), Maureen Walsh (CNDLS)

    Instructors are often hesitant to introduce or engage sensitive topics that can create conflict or discomfort in the classroom. This workshop discussed ways these difficult discussions can be turned into meaningful opportunities for learning.

  • Digital Anxieties: Questions about Copyright, Fair Use, Privacy and More

    Oct. 24—Speakers: Heidi Wachs, Director of IT Policy and Privacy Officer at the Office of Information Services (UIS), Sheila Zimmet, Senior Associate Vice President at the Office of Regulatory, Dave Smith, University Information Security Officer at University Information Services (UIS)

    While the Digital Age has made it easy to create, use, and share digital media, it has also raised many new questions and challenges for faculty. Our expert panel discussed key issues of copyright, fair use, and privacy surrounding teaching, learning, and research at Georgetown.

  • Syllabus Design

    Oct. 18—Instructors: John Rakestraw (CNDLS)

    This workshop discussed the fundamental components of a good syllabus as well as organizational approaches to designing one. In light of these components and approaches, the workshop discussed best practices of syllabus design through past examples.

  • Cyborg Theory and Practice

    Oct. 3—Presenter: Michael Chorost

    Are science-fiction cyborgs on the brink of turning into commercial realities? Michael Chorost, a book author and cochlear implant user, invited us to compare the science-fiction dreams of our culture to the realities of medical technology in 2011.

  • Promoting Meta-learning Using Social Technologies

    Oct. 3—Instructors: Anna Kruse (CNDLS), Matt Burstein (KIE/Philosophy)

    What teachers convey in the classroom is not merely the course's content; they model and train students in the very skill of learning. Online tools can facilitate this "meta-learning" (i.e., learning how to learn) by creating opportunities beyond the classroom for reflection, interaction, and assessment. In this workshop, we'll look at how technology can be used to create students who are producers, rather than consumers, of knowledge, who can identify and formulate good questions, and who are capable of self-assessment.

  • Assessment and Grading

    Sept. 29—Instructors: Mindy McWilliams (CNDLS), Maggie Debelius (English)

    In this workshop, we explore a variety of ways to understand what and how students are learning. Why wait until the end of the semester to find out that your students didn't 'get it'? We will introduce a number of techniques to use early in and midway through the semester to assess your students' true understanding of material. We will also discuss topics such as rubrics and taxonomies for easy and effective grading, and accounting for prior knowledge and possible misconceptions on the part of students.

  • Effective Classroom Interaction

    Sept. 19—Instructors: Janet Russell (CNDLS), Joselyn Schultz Lewis (CNDLS)

    This workshop covers various types of classroom interaction including lecture, discussion, and other activities that can be used in both small and large classes. Possible additional topics include the use of online communication environments to enhance class interactions both in and outside the classroom.

  • Intro to Teaching Resources

    Sept. 15—Instructors: John Rakestraw (CNDLS), Maureen Walsh (CNDLS)

    This orientation session serves as a welcome and introduction to the AT Program by CNDLS and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. You will meet other graduate students interested in the program, and will find out about teaching resources available to you as a graduate student here at Georgetown.

  • Writing Good Multiple Choice Questions

    Sept. 14—Presenters: Aviad Haramati (Department of Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology), Peggy Weissinger (Office of Medical Education, Georgetown University Medical Center)

    Effective use of clickers relies on well-written multiple choice questions (MCQs) to uncover misconceptions, generate student engagement and discussion, and promote student learning. But, how do you write quality MCQs that discourage rote memorization and encourage critical thinking? The "trick" in constructing these questions is avoiding common technical flaws in item development and targeting higher-level thinking skills such as application and integration. Such questions can assess a variety of learning objectives efficiently. In this session, we will discuss some simple steps and technical considerations in designing good multiple choice questions and practice using Bloom’s Taxonomy to target questions to the appropriate cognitive level. Participants are encouraged to bring MCQs with them to refine at the session.

    This session was co-sponsored by The Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship (CNDLS) and the Office of Faculty and Academic Affairs (OFAA).

    slides Download the slides here.

    handouts Download the handouts here.

  • Info Session: Teaching, Learning, & Technology Initiative

    April 27

    This session will offer faculty more information about the new Teaching, Learning, and Technology Initiative, launching this summer.

  • Effective Classroom Interaction

    April 4—Instructors: Janet Russell (CNDLS), Joselyn Schultz Lewis (CNDLS)

    This workshop covers various types of classroom interaction including lecture, discussion, and other activities that can be used in both small and large classes. Possible additional topics include the use of online communication environments to enhance class interactions both in and outside the classroom.

  • Lab Teaching

    Mar. 31—Instructors: Elena Shiffert (Biology), Michael Hickey (Biology)

    Description forthcoming.

  • Project Makeover: Redesigning Student Assignments

    Mar. 29

    This session will offer a window onto the process of pedagogical design. Two professors will bring assignments that they feel need reworking, and staff members from Gelardin and CNDLS, as well as other faculty members, will offer their suggestions for how to make the assignments more effective.

  • Syllabus Design

    Mar. 23—Instructor: John Rakestraw (CNDLS)

    In this workshop we will discuss the fundamental components of a good syllabus as well as organizational approaches to designing one. In light of these components and approaches, we will discuss best practices of syllabus design through past examples. Participants should bring a syllabus or ideas for a syllabus to the workshop to receive informal feedback from the group.

  • Using Clickers to Promote Active Learning

    Mar. 23—Instructor: Susan Pennestri (CNDLS)

    Research has shown that using active learning techniques increases student learning. This workshop will focus on the use of student response systems aka clickers in class to increase student engagement, discussion, collaboration, and participation. In this hands-on workshop, participants will learn how to use the i<clicker system, discover key benefits and challenges, identify ways to develop effective clicker questions, and learn about other practices and resources available for successful implementation.

  • Assessment & Grading

    Feb. 16—Instructors: Mindy McWilliams (CNDLS), Mark Rom (GPPI)

    In this workshop, we explore a variety of ways to understand what and how students are learning. Why wait until the end of the semester to find out that your students didn't 'get it'? We will introduce a number of techniques to use early in and midway through the semester to assess your students' true understanding of material. We will also discuss topics such as rubrics and taxonomies for easy and effective grading, and accounting for prior knowledge and possible misconceptions on the part of students.

  • Connecting with Participatory Culture: Teaching with Clickers for Deep Learning

    Feb. 8—Presenter: Derek Bruff, Assistant Director at the Vanderbilt Center for Teaching

    Today's students vote for their favorite contestants on American Idol, "like" a friend's wall post on Facebook, text each other while watching sports events, and engage in robust online discussions about World of Warcraft. We live in a participatory culture, one in which voting, commenting, creating, and sharing are the norm and people prefer being contributors to being consumers. Teaching with clickers is one way to tap into this culture, engaging students in ways that motivate them to participate during class in meaningful ways. In this talk, we'll explore ways that using clickers connects with our students' participatory culture and how those connections can be leveraged to promote deep learning.

    notes Read Derek Bruff's blog recap

    slides View Prezi presentaion

    video Watch more video from this event here!.

  • Class Time Reconsidered: Motivating Student Participation and Engagement

    Feb. 7—Presenter: Derek Bruff, Assistant Director at the Vanderbilt Center for Teaching

    Whether you have 20 students in your class or 200, motivating students to engage meaningfully with course material during class can be a challenge. Some are hesitant to speak up in front of their peers, some are preoccupied with taking notes, and others are more focused on grades than learning. How can instructors make their lectures more dynamic? What in-class activities help students grapple with tough questions, and which of these scale up well to large classes? What out-of-class activities can prepare students to participate more intentionally during class? In this talk, we'll explore some ways to rethink what you do— and what you have your students do—,during class, with the goal of increasing student attendance, participation, and engagement.

    notes Read CNDLS' blog recap

    slides View Prezi presentaion

    video Watch more video from this event here!

  • Clickers presentations at the Mid-Atlantic Regional EDUCAUSE Conference

    Jan. 15—Presenters: Janet Russell (CNDLS), Susan Pennestri (CNDLS)

    notes Read Janet Russell's blog post recapping the event here.

    slides Download Susan's poster here (.pdf).

    slides Download Janet's poster here (.pdf).

  • "The Problem of Learning in Higher Education" — Keynote Presentation at the University of Delaware Winter Faculty Institute

    Jan. 6—Presenter: Randy Bass (CNDLS)

2010

  • Project Makeover: Redesigning Student Assignments

    Oct. 22—Presenters: Janet Russell (CNDLS), Steve Fernie (GNMC)

    This session will offer a window onto the process of pedagogical design. Two professors will bring assignments that they feel need reworking, and staff members from CNDLS and Gelardin, as well as faculty in the audience, will offer their suggestions for how to make the assignments more effective. Please join us for what is sure to be an exciting session!

  • Conversing to Learn

    Oct. 21—Presenter: Peter Janssens (CNDLS)

    A panel of Georgetown foreign languages faculty will discuss the roles of conversation--both low-tech and high-tech, structured and spontaneous, in class and outside of class--in language learning. Panelists will include Michael Ferreira and João Telles (Portuguese), Fei Ren (Chinese), Kassem Wahba (Arabic), and Donatella Melucci (Italian).

  • Teaching Portfolio

    Oct. 13—Presenters: John Rakestraw (CNDLS), Joselyn Schultz Lewis (CNDLS)

    When beginning the job search, applicants for teaching positions are often asked to provide a teaching portfolio, a philosophy statement, or some other documentation from their teaching experience. How do you best demonstrate the depth and scope of your teaching skills and experiences? In this workshop, we will examine and discuss how you might document and reflect on the knowledge and skills gained from your teaching experience through developing a professional teaching portfolio. We will illustrate the iterative and continuing nature of portfolio construction. Participants will leave the workshop with a template for building their own teaching portfolios, as well as examples to support them in writing their own teaching philosophy statements.

  • Assessment and Grading

    Oct. 6—Presenters: Daryl Nardick (CNDLS), Mindy McWilliams (CNDLS), Mark Rom (GPPI)

    In this workshop, we explore a variety of ways to understand what and how students are learning. Why wait until the end of the semester to find out that your students didn't 'get it'? We will introduce a number of techniques to use early in and midway through the semester to assess your students' true understanding of material. We will also discuss topics such as rubrics and taxonomies for easy and effective grading, and accounting for prior knowledge and possible misconceptions on the part of the students.

  • AT Teaching Circle (Brownbag Lunch Discussion)

    Oct. 14—Presenter: John Rakestraw (CNDLS)

    This teaching circle will offer graduate students the opportunity to explore with their colleagues the challenges and excitement they experience as teachers. The agenda for teaching circle discussions will depend in part on questions and concerns that participants bring to the group. Participants are encouraged to bring their lunch. CNDLS will provide beverages.

  • Digital Technologies and Quality of Life: Examining Personal and Professional Issues

    Sept. 20—Presenter: Daryl Nardick (CNDLS)

    Have you ever considered how your use of digital technologies and social media has influenced the personal pace and rhythm of your life as well as the lives of your students? Have you considered how students' use of these tools—Facebook, cell phones, etc.—impacts how you teach and manage your classroom? Using data gleaned from a study currently being conducted by Georgetown and the University of Washington, we will explore these questions along with strategies to address students' "unsanctioned" use of technology in the classroom.

  • Harnessing the Cloud: Exploring Web Applications for Academic Projects

    Sept. 17—Presenters: Per Hoel (GNMC), Rob Pongsajapan (CNDLS)

    The internet—called the "cloud" by many—offers an amazing variety of groundbreaking applications that can run directly in your browser. "Cloudware" is fundamentally challenging the way we think about using programs on our computers—rather than purchasing, installing, and running a program on your computer, you can access these applications on any computer's browser, and most are free to use.

    Join Per and Rob for this 1-hour session which will feature 5 web apps, including a Photoshop-like application and one that lets you edit video and audio—all online, and all for free! The session will start with a short demonstration followed by interactive play and brainstorming about academic uses.

  • Introduction to Teaching Resources

    Sept. 15—Presenters: Rob Pongsajapan (CNDLS), Marie Selvanadin (CNDLS), Anna Kruse (CNDLS)

    Stop by to learn more about blogs, wikis, and other Georgetown Commons tools. You can bring a specific question for CNDLS staff or just show up and explore the options for incorporating these tools into your teaching or research. Both sessions will take place in the CNDLS conference room, 314 Car Barn.

  • Georgetown Commons Open House

    Sept. 14—Presenter: John Rakestraw (CNDLS)

    This orientation session serves as a welcome and introduction to the AT Program by CNDLS and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. You will meet other graduate students interested in the program and will find out about teaching resources available to you as a graduate student here at Georgetown.  The Introduction to Teaching Resources is held at the beginning of each semester.  Please note, if your class schedule prohibits your attendance at this orientation session, please let us know of your interest via email. You are still welcome to enroll in other workshops.  While a required program component, the introductory session is not a prerequisite for enrollment and participation in other program events.

  • Workshop on Undergraduate Research and Active Learning

    April 15—Presenter: Mick Healey

    On Thursday, April 15, Mick Healey led a workshop for Georgetown faculty and staff on “Strategies for developing an active research curriculum.” During the workshop, Healey, who directs the Centre for Active Learning at the University of Gloucestershire, explored such questions as:

    • How can we break down barriers between research and learning?
    • How might we embed undergraduate research into the curriculum?
    • How do we define what “research” or “inquiry-based learning” means in the context of the undergraduate curriculum?

    Healey shared case studies from a range of disciplines at various colleges and universities, and asked participants to brainstorm about strategies for further integrating undergraduate research into Georgetown’s institutional culture.

    slides Download the presentation slides here (.ppt).

    handouts Download the handouts here (.pdf).

  • Connecting Life and Learning: Teaching the Whole Person (Montclair State University)

    Mar. 5—Presenter: Randy Bass

    One powerful version of integrative learning is helping students connect their academic and intellectual work to their sense of wellness and mental health. This presentation described the Engelhard Project at Georgetown University that has used a "curriculum infusion" approach across the disciplines to help faculty and students find organic connections between intellectual material in coursework and issues of mental health and wellness. The success of the program depends especially on the collaborative partnerships forged among faculty, and student health and faculty development professionals. The presentation put the Project in a larger context of embodied learning, as well as described the components of the Project, how we have tried to assess its impact, and ongoing challenges.

    slides Download the presentation slides here (.pdf).

  • Shaping the Life of the Mind for Practice

    Mar. 2—Presenter: William Sullivan

    William Sullivan, Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, spoke on Tuesday, March 2 at 4pm in the Murray Room (Lauinger Library, 5th floor). In his presentation, titled "Shaping the Life of the Mind for Practice," Sullivan focused on on the concept of "practical reason" as a "new agenda for higher education," one that prioritizes and designs for curricular approaches that help students develop reasoned and responsible judgment in conditions of uncertainty.

    video Video coming soon.

  • Scholarly Communications Symposium: Social Media

    Feb. 19—Presenters: Eddie Maloney, Gerry McCartney, Ulises Mejias

    Social media tools have gained widespread use across our campuses in a very short time. Many academic disciplines are also adopting these online tools as they embrace collaboration and interactivity. The implications of these developments are profound--not only for scholars and students but also for the potential transformation of the teaching and learning process. How do social media networks change the way our students learn and our faculty teach? How is the traditional classroom relationship altered? Are students becoming more active and engaged learners? The speakers were Gerry McCartney, Vice President for Information Technology and CIO and Oesterle Professor of Information Technology, Purdue University; Edward Maloney, Director of Research and Learning Technology at the Center for New Designs in Leaning and Scholarship and Visiting Assistant Professor of English, Georgetown University; and Ulises Mejias, Assistant Professor of New Media in the Communication Studies Department at the State University of New York at Oswego.

  • Rosenzweig Forum on the Digital Humanities

    Feb. 17—Presenters: Timothy Powell and Bethany Nowviskie

    Timothy Powell (University of Pennsylvania) and Bethany Nowviskie (University of Virginia) will present and lead a discussion on digital humanities. Powell will discuss his work creating digital archives of Ojibwe cultural materials, and Nowviskie will share her work with NINES, SpecLab, and the Scholars' Lab at the University of Virginia.

    slides For Parts 2-4, Visit the Rosenzweig Forum Album on Vimeo.

  • Microblogging workshop

    Feb. 1—Instructors: Rob Pongsajapan (CNDLS) and Michael Matason (Gelardin)

    This workshop provided instruction on how to use Twitter; an online microblogging service that offers a way to share short bites of information instantly with others. We held an overview about Twitter and its features. The discussion explored various ways educators and companies use Twitter to communicate to their followers and what makes a successful Twitter page. We also took a look at other 3rd party applications that take microblogging to the next level by allowing users to track statistics, posts videos/photos, and allow for more integration in other web 2.0 applications.

    slides Download the presentation slides here (.pdf).

  • Getting Started with Blogs at Georgetown

    Feb. 1—Instructors: Rob Pongsajapan and Marie Selvanadin (CNDLS)

    Georgetown faculty, staff, and students have used WordPress—the blogging tool offered by CNDLS as part of the Georgetown Commons project—for classes, research portfolios, and content management. Participants received hands-on training on how to set up, use, and customize WordPress to their needs.

  • Provost's Seminar 2010

    Jan. 19—Featured Speakers: Julie Reynolds, David Pace

    2010's Provost’s Seminar on Teaching and Learning offered three opportunities for faculty to participate in ongoing discussions about teaching, learning and the curriculum, building on the Provost’s Call to Action: Curriculum and Learning at Georgetown and the 2009 Fall Faculty Convocation’s focus on teaching and learning at Georgetown.

    videoVideo: "A Systematic Approach to Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Theses"

    videoVideo: "New Approaches for Improving Student Engagement in Large Enrollment Classes"

    videoVideo: "Big Concepts and Instructional Bottlenecks: the ‘Decoding the Disciplines’ Approach"

  • Clickers Community of Practice

    Jan. 13—Presenter: Matt Carnes

  • 2009

    • Articulating Instructional Goals

      Oct. 28—Instructor: Janet Russell (CNDLS)

      What do I want my students to learn? Every instructor asks this question, but you can't answer it until you define what knowledge, skills, and understandings you want your students to take away from your course. What outcomes do you desire?

      These outcomes—your instructional goals—must be phrased in active terms that clearly tell students what is expected. A clear and complete set of learning goals also helps you develop authentic assessments by targeting those aspects of your students' learning that you most value.

      In this workshop, we discussed how to establish and frame a set of learning goals that represent the learning outcomes you most desire and explicitly communicate these to your students. Participants interested in bringing teaching/learning goals with them to refine at the workshop were encouraged to do so.

      slides Download the presentation slides here (.pdf).

      handouts Download the handouts here (.pdf).

    • "No Time to Think" — A Talk by David Levy, Ph.D.

      Oct. 23—Point of Contact: Daryl Nardick (CNDLS)

      David Levy, a technologist by training and a professor in the Information School at the University of Washington, discussed his research on the effects of contemporary information technologies on work habits, attention spans, and the amount of time available for personal reflection and contemplation. David’s talk explored why it is that we have “no time to think,” and what we can do about it, on individual, institutional, and societal levels.

      notes Download the notes here (.pdf).

    • Pedagogically Sound Uses of Presentation Software

      Sep. 29—Instructors: John Rakestraw and Paulina Maldonado (CNDLS)

      Many instructors are using PowerPoint and other presentation software programs to present information to students, and many students expect professors to use these materials. At the same time, many of the professors using these software programs have doubts about their effectiveness, and many students complain about the design and/or use of the slide presentations. In this workshop, we considered several basic pedagogical principles underlying effective classroom presentations, and considered how these principles might shape the design and use of visual aids in the classroom. Participants learned not only how to design engaging slides, but also how to use these slides as part of an effective classroom presentation.

      slides Download the presentation slides here (.pdf).

    Links to other event resources