Events & Workshops

CNDLS is pleased to offer a variety of workshops for faculty and graduate students on a range of topics related to teaching practice and technology. Brief descriptions follow below, along with applicable registration information.

 

CNDLS is pleased to offer a variety of workshops and programs to the Georgetown community listed on the calendar below. Our calendar also features programming offered by our campus partners. To access a full list of each month’s offerings, please click on the month listed to the left of this page. To have your teaching & learning-related events added to this calendar, please reach out to cndls@georgetown.edu and we will do our best to accommodate your request. We look forward to seeing you at a future event!

February 2018

  • 1

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: Intro to InDesign (Part 1)

    Participants will be introduced to desktop publishing and the InDesign interface, and will learn how to import and format text, create frames, place text and images into frames, manipulate and organize objects in layers, manipulate text and images into basic layouts, and export projects as PDF files. Having completed the workshop, participants should be able to create basic documents such as brochures, pamphlets, and posters and prepare them for printing. No previous knowledge of InDesign or other desktop publishing software is required. Click here to register.

    Picchi Lab, Gelardin New Media Center (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 2

    Feb

    Georgetown Slavery Archive Editing Workshop

    Join the Library and Wikimedia DC on February 2 for a special Wikipedia editing workshop to create and enrich Wikipedia articles with information from the Georgetown Slavery Archive.

    Wikipedia is an openly editable resource, meaning that you can improve the quality and accuracy of Wikipedia entries. As one of the web’s most visited reference sites, Wikipedia serves as a starting point for visitors who want to learn more about a variety of topics.

    In 1838, Jesuit priests sold 272 enslaved people who worked on Jesuit plantations in Southern Maryland. Proceeds from the sale were used to pay a portion of Georgetown University's debts. The Georgetown Slavery Archive was established in 2016 to maintain and share materials related to slavery and the 1838 sale. We will use these materials to edit and create relevant Wikipedia articles. New editors are welcome. Training will be provided. Click here to register.

    Murray Room (Floor 5, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 5

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: Hands-on Video Production Techniques

    This hands-on workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to learn how to set up a professional, yet basic production shoot. This includes learning how to capture quality audio and video footage using both DSLR and HD video cameras, as well as touching on the fundamentals of cinematography and lighting techniques.  Click here to register.

    Production Studio, Gelardin New Media Center (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 6

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: Video Editing with Adobe Premiere

    Adobe Premiere Pro is a professional video editing application that is used to combine video and audio clips, music, graphics, titles, and still images to produce finished sequences. This workshop will teach participants the basic process of creating a project, importing assets, basic edits to audio and video, and keyboard shortcuts. Click here to register.

    Picchi Lab, Gelardin New Media Center (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 7

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: Intro to Tableau

    In this workshop, participants will learn how to plan for a visualization project, choose appropriate chart types, and use Tableau Public to create engaging and interactive charts. No coding or programming experience is required. Click here to register.

    Picchi Lab, Gelardin New Media Center (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    10:00 AM

  • 8

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: Intro to InDesign (Part II)

    Participant will expand on their knowledge from the Introduction to InDesign course by learning advanced text formatting, advanced layouts including master pages, creating gradients, adding effects, advanced image placement with Photoshop, package and export projects as PDF files. Having completed the beginner and advanced workshops, participants should be able to create basic documents such as brochures, pamphlets, and posters and prepare them for printing. Click here to register.

    Picchi Lab, Gelardin New Media Center (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 9

    Feb

    AT Program: Thresholds and Bottlenecks Elective Workshop

    'Threshold concepts' refer to a theory about the nature of learning within a discipline—that in studying a given discipline there are key concepts that, once learned, irrevocably transform the way we perceive the subject. 'Bottlenecks' are likewise a discipline-specific phenomenon and refer to key pinch points where students commonly struggle. Identifying and planning for thresholds and bottlenecks are an important part of course design, pedagogical practice, and assessment.

    HFSC: Social Room
    10:00 AM

  • 13

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: Video Editing with iMovie

    This workshop will introduce participants to the techniques and concepts of video editing. Participants will learn how to import video, edit scenes, add effects, transitions, and export a final movie using iMovie. Click here to register.

    Picchi Lab, Gelardin New Media Center (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 14

    Feb

    AT Program: Designing Writing Assignments and Commenting on Student Work Elective Workshop

    In this workshop, we will explore the life cycle of an assignment - from its design to assessment. Through hands-on activities, we will address these questions: How can we design assignments that align with our course goals? How can scaffolding and low-stakes writing assist students in producing quality work? What forms of response are most effective in helping students improve their writing? Participants should bring a syllabus (or an idea for a course) as well as an assignment (or an idea for an assignment).

    HFSC: Social Room
    3:00 PM

  • 15

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: Intro to Illustrator

    In this workshop participants will learn the basics of Adobe Illustrator and creating basic vector paths. This workshop will cover the Adobe Illustrator interface, including artboards, toolbars and layers. The course will focus on to creating basic vector shapes with the curvature tools and complex shapes with the pen and pencil tools. Click here to register.

    Picchi Lab, Gelardin New Media Center (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 16

    Feb

    AT Program: Book Club 2:4 Elective Workshop

    Join us for our second book discussion of Small Teaching on 2/16 from 10-11 AM in the Lannan Room (NN 408). In this session we will discuss chapters 4 and 5. Please note: anyone is welcome to join us for any of our four meetings, but in order to receive credit for an elective in the AT Program, you need to attend three of the four sessions. A copy of the book can be checked out from the CNDLS suite in Car Barn 314.

    Lannan Room (New North 408)
    10:00 AM

  • 17

    Feb

    MLK Evening of Hope and Resistance

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a master orator. He understood that words have power as time-and-time again, he so eloquently used his voice to shed light on injustices. This year, Georgetown University honors Dr. King's legacy of captivating hearts, and ears through an evening of spoken word, poetry and music highlighting his speech "I've Been to the Mountaintop." We hope that, through this evening of reflection and artistic expression, we can stir imaginations for change and hope for the future.

    The evening will consist of original spoken word and poetry readings, musical performances from students and organizations, as well as a visual art share. We will also have service activities to support low-income youth, and families. Food will be provided.

    For more information and to register to perform or submit visual art, please click here for the event's webpage.

    This event is hosted by the Let Freedom Ring! Initiative of the Office of the President, honoring the life and legacy of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    HFSC: Social Room
    6:00 PM

  • 20

    Feb

    Lunch and Book Talk: "Making College Work - Pathways to Success for Disadvantaged Students" by Harry Holzer & Sandy Baum

    This event will feature Harry Holzer, Professor of Public Policy at the McCourt School at Georgetown University, and Sandy Baum, Senior Fellow at the Urban Institute and will feature their newly released book, Making College Work - Pathways to Success for Disadvantaged Students, published by Brookings Institution Press. Their book highlights practical solutions for improving higher education opportunities for economically diverse students. Click here to register for the event.

    This event is part of a year-long recognition of the 50 years of the Georgetown University’s Community Scholars Program in the Center for Multicultural Equity and Access. It is hosted by the Let Freedom Ring! Initiative of the Office of the President.

    Social Room (Healey Family Student Center)
    11:00 AM

  • 20

    Feb

    Panel: African American Employment, Population, and Housing Trends in Washington, DC featuring Prof. Maurice Jackson

    This panel event will spotlight Professor Maurice Jackson's engaged scholarship and service as the first Chair of the DC Commission on African American Affairs, appointed by DC Mayor Vincent Gray in 2013. Dr. Jackson, Associate Professor of History and African American Studies, will present findings from his compelling DC-based research documented in this publication, African American Employment, Population, and Housing Trends. Vice President for Institutional Equity and Diversity, Rosemary Kilkenny, Esp., will open the event. After Professor Jackson's remarks, Heidi Tseu, Director of Local Government Affairs, and Dr. Eva Rosen, Assistant Professor at the McCourt School of Public Policy, will offer comments. A reception will follow the panel event.

    Click here to register for this event.

    This event is part of the Let Freedom Ring! Initiative of the Office of the President and Social Justice Week of the Center for Social Justice.

    Arrupe Multipurpose Room (Arrupe Residence Hall)
    4:00 PM

  • 21

    Feb

    AT Program: Implicit Bias in the Classroom and What You Can Do About It Elective Workshop

    In this workshop, we’ll explore a dilemma; on the one hand, unconscious biases are a normal, natural result of the workings of the human mind, and so we all have them; on the other hand, these biases (especially given the way they crop up around social dimensions like race, gender, sexuality, and so on) can hamper our ability to teach all of our students equally well. Fortunately, there are strategies that can help us become more self-aware and begin pushing back against our biases. This workshop will focus on concrete things we can do to keep unconscious bias out of our pedagogy.

    HFSC: Social Room
    10:00 AM

  • 21

    Feb

    2017 Education and Social Justice Project Presentations

    During its eighth year, the Education and Social Justice Project awarded summer fellowships to four students who spent three weeks with institutions engaged in efforts to promote social justice through education in Mozambique, Australia, Ukraine, and the Dominican Republic. Under faculty supervision, the students gather information through interviews, analyze best practices, and share their reports and conclusions with a wider global audience. At this symposium, the 2017 fellows will present their research findings and experiences abroad, and hold a question and answer session with the audience. All students with an interest in education, social justice, and international research are encouraged to attend and learn about applying for the upcoming summer fellowships.

    Click here to register for this event.

    This event is part of the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching & Service's Social Justice Week.

    Third Floor Conference Room (Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs)

    3307 M Street NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC
    12:00 PM

  • 21

    Feb

    13th Annual Careers for the Common Good

    Careers for the Common Good is an annual event that brings together current undergraduates with over 75 alumni and DC area professionals who are working in industries and fields that support "the common good." Throughout the ninety minute networking event, alumni and local professionals share their career path experiences, advice, suggestions and lessons-learned to help students take a step towards a career for the common good. Career fields and industries represented include nonprofit organizations, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, social and direct service organizations, and alumni engaged in health, international development, environment and sustainability, education, philanthropy, advocacy, activism, and more. While this event is geared towards undergraduate students of all years, graduate students are welcome to attend.

    To register for this event, click here.

    This event is part of the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching & Service's Social Justice Week.

    Fisher Colloquium (4th Floor, Rafik Hariri Building)
    7:00 PM

  • 22

    Feb

    Social Justice Summer Opportunities Fair

    Center for Social Justice offers opportunities to stay engaged and serve over the summer. Stop by our Summer Opportunities Fair to learn about part-time and full-time engagement through mentoring high school students, teaching in school classrooms, and beyond. Current CSJ tutors, mentors, coordinators, trip leaders, board members, and student organization officers are invited to stop by for appreciation - light snacks and de-stressing arts and crafts activities.

    This event is part of the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching & Service's Social Justice Week.

    Great Room (Healey Family Student Center)
    12:00 PM

  • 22

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: LinkedIn Makeover

    During this workshop participants will learn the best practices of creating a LinkedIn profile that will attract potential employers and expand one's professional network. Participants will also have a chance to get a professional headshot taken in a studio setting. The headshots will be shared digitally with participants 1-2 weeks after the workshop. Click here to register.

    Willbert B. Dubin Memorial Classroom (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 22

    Feb

    Faculty and Staff Time with "Are You Ready?" Keynote Speaker, Marissa Alexander

    Health Education Services and the Women's Center, in partnership with the Center for Social Justice will host an afternoon discussion with this year's "Are You Ready?" keynote speaker, Marissa Alexander of the Marissa Alexander Justice Project. This will be a space to discuss, ask questions, and explore how these issues impact the Georgetown community over coffee and dessert. To RSVP for this event, please click here.

    Ms. Alexander is an advocate for survivors of domestic violence and social injustice. She comes from a military family and holds a BS in Information Technology and a MBA. In 2016, she founded the Marissa Alexander Justice Project (MAJP), which seeks to provide services that promote unity through the collaboration of social justice, criminal reform, and anti-domestic violence movements. MAJP specifically provides support to domestic violence survivors as they navigate the intersections of familial, community, and criminal justice systems.

    This event is part of the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching & Service's Social Justice Week.

    Herman Room (Healey Family Student Center)
    3:00 PM

  • 22

    Feb

    Paul Mihailidis Book Talk: "Civic Media Literacies: Re-Imagining Engagement for Intentionality, Impact, and Equity"

    In the midst of a renewed call for media literacy initiatives that respond to the increasing levels of partisanship, tribalism and distrust, this talk argues that media literacy interventions must be re-imagined as intentionally civic. A new set of emerging norms of digital culture further put into question the relevance of long standing approaches to media literacy pedagogy and practice. This presentation puts forward a new set of constructs that position media literacy initiatives to produce and reproduce the sense of being in the world with others toward common good. These constructs—agency, caring, critical consciousness, persistence, and emancipation—reframe media literacy as relevant to the social, political and technological realities of contemporary life. To register for this event, click here.

    Paul Mihailidis is an associate professor of journalism and civic media in the school of communication at Emerson College in Boston, MA, where he teaches media literacy, civic media, and community activism. He is founding program director of the MA in Civic Media: Art & Practice, Principle Investigator of the Emerson Engagement Lab, and faculty chair and director of the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change.

    This event is part of the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching & Service's Social Justice Week.

    Car Barn 205
    5:30 PM

  • 22

    Feb

    A War to End All Wars, 100 Years Since WWI

    Join the Library Associates and the Booth Family Center for Special Collections for a gallery talk detailing the exhibition, A War to End All Wars? which will run from Feburary - June 2018 in the Fairchild Gallery, Special Collections Gallery, and Leon Robbin Gallery on the 5th Floor of Lauinger Library.

    In collaboration with the Department of Art & Art History, the event will feature a lecture from Keyser Family Professor of Art History Elizabeth Prelinger, guest curator of the exhibition.

    The multifaceted exhibition will be drawn primarily from the Center’s permanent holdings with additions from Prelinger’s own collection. Organized around eight major themes, the show will explore art, culture, and history by assembling an exciting variety of objects—from posters to poetry to anti-gas eye shields. One theme examines Georgetown University’s own connections with the War, while another showcases original World War I sheet music. Thanks to Georgetown’s creative collecting over many decades, the exhibition abounds with unusual and unforgettable items that will bring alive to current viewers this catastrophic and world-changing event.

    Reception to follow program. Click here to RSVP for the event.

    Murray Conference Room (Floor 5, Lauinger Library)
    6:00 PM

  • 22

    Feb

    Are You Ready?: A Conversation with Marissa Alexander

    Please join Health Education Services, The Women's Center and the Center for Social Justice (CSJ) for Are You Ready on Tuesday, February 22, 2018! Are You Ready is the fourth tier of the HoyUs educational model for intimate partner violence prevention at Georgetown University. Are You Ready is a dynamic student and community program that addresses interpersonal violence through a social justice lens. The program features a keynote speaker and will be followed by small group discussions led by student facilitators. The content of this program will focus on domestic violence and social justice, and will be held the Thursday evening of Georgetown's CSJ's Social Justice Week.

    This year, the keynote speaker will be Marissa Alexander of the Marissa Alexander Justice Project. Ms. Alexander is an advocate for survivors of domestic violence and social injustice. She comes from a military family and holds a BS in Information Technology and a MBA. In 2016, she founded the Marissa Alexander Justice Project (MAJP), which seeks to provide services that promote unity through the collaboration of social justice, criminal reform, and anti-domestic violence movements. MAJP specifically provides support to domestic violence survivors as they navigate the intersections of familial, community, and criminal justice systems. To register for this event, click here.

    This event is part of the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching & Service's Social Justice Week.

    Idol Social Room (Healey Family Student Center)
    7:00 PM

  • 23

    Feb

    Jad Melki: Communication Strategies of Modern Terrorism: The ISIS Media Model

    This talk discusses the media strategies of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and highlights the group's ability to implement a combination of terrorism tactics synchronized with communication strategies to gain media exposure, push news frames that serve its interests, disseminate a consistent brand, and target well-defined stakeholders with a dual message using sophisticated branding strategies that resonate with cultural values and help it ultimately recruit supporters and deter opponents. While the Islamic State as a geopolitical entity is almost eliminated, its innovative media strategies provide a model for future extremist groups to utilize and important lessons for those countering extremism and youth radicalization to learn from. To register for this event, click here.

    Jad Melki, Ph.D. is associate professor of journalism and media studies and chairperson of the Communication Arts Department at the Lebanese American University. He has been a broadcast and digital journalist for over 15 years working with US and Arab media. Melki was part of the Webby award and National Press Club award winning Hot Zone team (Yahoo! News) covering the 2006 Israel-Lebanon war. He is also an affiliated researcher at the ICMPA center at the University of Maryland and a faculty at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. Previously, Melki was founder and director of the Media Studies Program at the American University of Beirut and visiting faculty at the graduate Communication program at Johns Hopkins University.

    This event is part of the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching & Service's Social Justice Week.

    Herman Room (Healey Family Student Center)
    1:00 PM

  • 23

    Feb

    After School Kids (ASK) 30th Anniversary Dinner

    Celebrate 30 years of the ASK Program on Friday, February 23 at Georgetown University's Copley Formal Lounge (map), which is accessible from Red Square in the center of GU's campus. The ASK Program was founded in 1987 to connect Georgetown students, staff, and faculty with court-involved youth in the Washington, DC area. For the past 30 years, hundreds of Hoyas and ASK youth have learned together, shared meals, and built community. To RSVP for this event, please click here.

    This event is part of the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching & Service's Social Justice Week.

    Copley Formal Lounge
    5:00 PM

  • 24

    Feb

    Outspoken: Rise Up

    Join GU NAACP and GU Women of Color at the intersection of activism and art for their annual open mic night. Outspoken is an event that brings together the Georgetown community for performance of spoken word, song, and dance. We are pleased to have special guest Anthony McPherson performing at this year’s event.

    This event is supported by the Let Freedom Ring! Initiative.

    Bulldog Alley
    7:30 PM

  • 26

    Feb

    Gelardin New Media Center Workshop: Social Media Marketing

    This workshop will introduce some of the concepts, platforms, and tools in the Social Media landscape. Participants will discuss social media engagement, how to set and implement specific goals & strategies, and get hands-on experience with Facebook Pages and Twitter. Click here to register.

    Picchi Lab, Gelardin New Media Center (Floor 1, Lauinger Library)
    2:00 PM

  • 28

    Feb

    AT Program: The Teaching Portfolio Required Workshop

    This workshop explains and demonstrates how to document and reflect on the knowledge and skills gained from your teaching experience through developing a professional teaching portfolio. We will illustrate the iterative and continuing nature of portfolio construction by demonstrating the revision process used in writing and revising a teaching philosophy statement. Participants will leave the workshop with a template for building their own teaching portfolios, as well as examples to support them in writing their own teaching philosophy statement.

    HFSC: Social Room
    10:00 AM

Materials
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Please note that, while Apprenticeship in Teaching (AT) workshops are open to faculty, they are designed for graduate students. Presentations and many of the exercises are designed for instructors with relatively little teaching experience. Some workshops are more appropriate than others for those with more teaching experience. Faculty with a particular interest in one of the AT workshops should contact James Olsen before registering.