Connect with CNDLS

Learn more about how we support teaching and learning at Georgetown

The Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) supports Georgetown University faculty and graduate students at every level of their teaching as they consider their impact on student learning.

For example, we help faculty and graduate students refine new educational approaches, design programs to assess student learning, and incorporate technology into their course design.

CNDLS supports Georgetown faculty and graduate students in a number of ways. In the resources below, we hope you will explore the various services we offer. Feel free to contact us to schedule a consultation!

Teaching Support

  1. I’m new to teaching at Georgetown. How can I get started planning my class?
  2. I’m looking for ways to enrich and deepen my teaching. What resources does CNDLS offer?
  3. Are my students learning? How can I tell?

Technology-enhanced Teaching and Learning

  1. How can I use technology to enhance my teaching and my students’ learning?
  2. What resources does CNDLS offer to support online learning?

CNDLS Programs and Initiatives

  1. What programs or initiatives does CNDLS offer that can help support my teaching?
  2. Who at CNDLS can I meet with to discuss an issue with a course or program?

Resources on SoTL

  1. How can I find out more about research on the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), and how can I apply it in my classroom?

University Teaching Policies

  1. What are some University teaching policies that I should be aware of as a faculty member or graduate student at Georgetown?
  2. Does CNDLS offer resources to support the new diversity requirement at Georgetown?

Services for Departments

  1. What services does CNDLS offer to departments?

    Teaching Support

  • I’m new to teaching at Georgetown. How can I get started planning my class?

    Whether you are new to teaching in higher education or just new to Georgetown, you may be looking for resources that can help you plan your class. CNDLS offers a variety of services to support course design.

    READ MORE
    • If you are a graduate student who is new to college teaching, consider our Apprentice in Teaching Program, which is designed to enhance the preparation of graduate students as teachers.
    • If you are a new faculty member teaching at Georgetown for the first time, you may want to visit our page of New Faculty Frequently Asked Questions. These include information on policies for student interaction and other Georgetown University policies, as well as resources on course logistics and faculty development.
    • When writing your course syllabi, you may need to be familiar with particular teaching policies at Georgetown. On our page on syllabus policies, you will find quotes from the official university policies (with hyperlinks to the original sources included), as well as some examples how Georgetown faculty have included this information on their syllabi.
    • One Georgetown policy with which you may want to become familiar is our policy on instructional continuity, which encourages faculty to be prepared to maintain instructional activities during unforeseen disruptions, such as weather emergencies or other incidences that may require campus to close. As you consider methods for implementing instructional continuity, you may also want to visit our page on Teaching and Learning Technologies: Tools and Services at Georgetown, which provides information on all the technology tools and services you have available when teaching at Georgetown. Many of these tools, such as e-learning management systems, lecture capture, and VoiceThread, among others, will help you maintain instruction when you and your students may not be on campus.
    • For additional information on designing a course, visit the Teaching Commons, a comprehensive handbook offering resources and advice on many aspects of course planning and implementation. On the topic of course design, the Teaching Commons includes pages on designing backward, setting appropriate learning goals, mapping out assessments, and identifying appropriate teaching strategies to serve your course goals.
  • I’m looking for ways to enrich and deepen my teaching. What resources does CNDLS offer?

    Even many experienced faculty are often looking for ways to enrich and deepen their teaching practices, or to transform the way students approach learning in their classes. CNDLS provides a number of resources, as well as targeted programs and initiatives, aimed at helping faculty enhance and innovate their pedagogical strategies.

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    • The Teaching Commons would be a good place to start when thinking about expanding or revising your teaching practices. This comprehensive resource covers numerous topics that may help you bring fresh approaches into your classroom. To support faculty teaching a course, we have pages on employing active learning strategies, managing classroom space effectively, facilitating class discussions, preparing for potentially difficult class discussions, evaluating student learning, gathering student feedback, and teaching with technology.

    Enriching your course through technology-enhanced learning:

    One way to develop new teaching practices may be through your use of innovative teaching technologies. You can begin by visiting our pages on Teaching and Learning Technologies: Tools and Services at Georgetown to get information on all the technology tools and services available at Georgetown, including Blackboard, blogs, clickers, ePortfolio, and more. It’s a good idea to transition to new technologies gradually, and to experiment with one tool at a time in any given course. To determine which technology tools might best support your particular learning goals, contact us today to set up a consultation with a member of CNDLS’ staff.

    • Many faculty members are now integrating technologies to “flip the classroom”—to provide resources and information through tools outside of class and use class meetings to facilitate more active, hands-on learning. Our page on Teaching with Technologies offers tips on how to approach flipping your class.

    • Some faculty members are moving their classes fully or partially online through courses designed to be held in the online space; these courses may be fully online or blended, which include both online and face-to-face components. If you are considering moving part or all of your course online, you should begin by talking with your program or department chair to see whether this option will work within your program. You may also want to review our resources on Online Course Design to learn more about instructional considerations for these courses, as well as the resources CNDLS can offer for support.

    • CNDLS is pleased to be supporting two new technology tools that we anticipate will help faculty innovate their use of technologies in the classroom:

      • Canvas is a course management system that offers an alternative to Blackboard, offering ways for instructors to make content, activities, assessments, and communication tools available to students. We invite you to learn more about what Canvas offers, as well as your options for migrating to this system.
      • Domain of One’s Own is a hosting environment that gives students, faculty, and staff members personal domain names and web space to allow them to take ownership of their digital identities. When faculty integrate this tool into their classroom, both the faculty member and students can set up their own unique Georgetown domains, allowing each participant to construct and manage their web presence while at Georgetown. You can learn more about piloting this tool or using it in your classroom at Georgetown Domains.
    • If you are teaching foreign language at Georgetown and want to learn more about resources available to enhance your teaching, The Language Learning Technology (LLT) Center provides a variety of materials, services, and consulting support that promote the integration of technology into foreign language teaching and learning at Georgetown University.

    Enriching your teaching through targeted programs and Initiatives:

    CNDLS manages several programs and initiatives aimed at supporting faculty in their teaching. Many of the programs outlined below follow a cohort model that brings faculty members together to support one another in their professional development.

    • The Initiative on Technology-Enhanced Learning (ITEL) provides faculty the funding and support they need to bring technology-focused teaching and learning projects to life. ITEL serves as an incubator for boundary-pushing experiments and helps to facilitate the widespread adoption of promising technology-enhanced tools and approaches. To initiate an ITEL project, faculty members submit grant proposals as part of the program’s open call. Stay tuned for information on upcoming open calls.

    • The Engelhard Project for Connecting Life and Learning focuses on teaching to the whole student. By incorporating health and wellness issues into the classroom, Engelhard faculty fellows use a curriculum infusion approach to foster academic learning and to encourage students to reflect on their own attitudes and behaviors. If you are interested in becoming an Engelhard faculty fellow, please contact the project team at cndls@georgetown.edu.

    • The Doyle Engaging Difference Program encourages Georgetown students and faculty to consider the value of difference and to engage it through enhanced learning opportunities inside and outside the classroom. This program is a campus-wide collaboration between the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) and Georgetown College. If you are interested in becoming a Doyle faculty fellow, please contact the project team at cndls@georgetown.edu.

    • CNDLS offers our annual Teaching, Learning, and Innovation Summer Institute (TLISI), providing Georgetown faculty and graduate students with four days of workshops, seminars, and productive open design spaces (PODS) around topics of teaching and learning. We invite you to review the resources available from last year’s program, and to begin exploring the opportunities for your pedagogical development at the 2016 TLISI.

    There are several grant opportunities available through CNDLS that can support your teaching, including:

    • Curriculum Enrichment Grants support class-related activities that strengthen the intellectual climate around introductory-level undergraduate courses. These grants are intended to expose students to the larger community, bringing the curricular and co-curricular together to give students in introductory classes a richer sense of the applications of work in a given discipline. These grants can be used to fund field trips, performance attendance, lectures, cultural dinners, and other activities designed to foster dialogue inside and outside the classroom. All full-time and part-time faculty are eligible to apply for curriculum enrichment grants of up to $500.

    • Doyle Diversity Grants are meant to fund projects which help students engage with diversity or gain a greater recognition of their own positionality vis-a-vis issues of plurality and social justice. All full-time and part-time faculty are eligible to apply for Doyle grants of up to $500, with current and former Doyle faculty fellows receiving priority.

    • ITEL Grants support faculty members who want to implement large-scale experiments with technologies and pedagogical designs to improve teaching and learning, either at the course or curricular level. For each round of ITEL awards, CNDLS announces an open call inviting faculty to submit proposals. Stay tuned to the ITEL website for information on any upcoming open calls for the program.

  • Are my students learning? How can I tell?

    Helping faculty assess student learning is an integral part of the work CNDLS does to support learning outcomes at Georgetown. We approach assessment as one of many tools faculty can use to foster formational outcomes, and we believe assessment begins with course design. CNDLS offers a variety of assessment services that can help you at multiple stages of your course, from planning to implementation and, finally, reflection.

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    • Determining appropriate assessments for your course begins with the course design. CNDLS offers several resources aimed at helping you design your course to optimize learning, as well as to build in a variety of assessment activities--both formal and informal--that can help you measure the learning taking place in your course.

      • As you get started thinking about the role of assessment in your course, you may want to visit our page on Assessment Services to learn about the range of classroom assessments (some graded and some ungraded) that you may want to implement in your course.

      • The Teaching Commons also provides information on how you might consider assessment in your overall course design.

      • Finally, Georgetown University’s Assessment Portal offers a framework of guiding questions to help you develop an iterative plan for course-level assessment, from initial development of learning goals to mid-semester evaluation methods to post-course analysis, reflection, and redesign. The Assessment Portal also provides a guide for developing rubrics that can help you design appropriate methods for grading and commenting on students’ formal work.

    • While many faculty are familiar with end-of-semester course evaluations, you may also want to consider inviting feedback from your students while your course is still in progress. CNDLS offers Mid-Semester Group Feedback sessions that help faculty gather feedback from students on all aspects of a course. In an MSGF session, a CNDLS staff member will conduct the feedback review with students and then report the information to the faculty member; the results are entirely confidential and will not be shared with anyone beyond the faculty member who requested the service. To schedule an MSGF or to learn more about this valuable service, contact us at cndls@georgetown.edu.

    • Gathering teaching feedback at the end of the semester can help you make informed decisions about changes you might make in future iterations of your course. While you may not be able to correlate this type of feedback directly with more formal measures of student learning in your course, course evaluations can provide insight into how your students responded to elements of your course design, course activities, and teaching strategies. Our Teaching Commons provides information on how you might design course evaluations—and make use of them—as well as how you might solicit peer evaluations from fellow faculty and program chairs.

    • Building in opportunities for reflective and integrated learning is essential for helping students better assess their own learning in a course. One way to do this may be through the use of ePortfolios in your course, which allow students to construct a digital archive that represents their work over time through a broad range of artifacts. Traditionally, ePortfolios have been adopted in teaching and learning to provide a space for students to collect their work and reflect on the connections visible to them. To learn more about the technology tools available at Georgetown for ePortfolios, as well as models of implementation you may use to make these part of your course design, visit our ePortfolios Tools page.

    • As you consider assessment, you may want to think about how your course-level assessments work to support larger program-level goals. Georgetown’s Assessment Portal offers information that departments may need to know as they consider program-level assessment, including identifying student learning goals, aligning program goals with individual course curriculum, gathering evidence of student learning, interpreting student learning outcomes, and using that evidence to improve learning.

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    Technology-enhanced Teaching and Learning

  • How can I use technology to enhance learning in my classes?

    Integrating technology into your classroom does not always require a large shift in the way you structure your class. On the other hand, you may be looking to implement a more significant integration of technology into the teaching space. Whether you are interested in small or large technology-enhanced innovations, CNDLS can support your goals.

    READ MORE
    • If you are looking to enhance your teaching practices through the use of innovative teaching technologies, you can begin by visiting our page on Teaching and Learning Technologies: Tools and Services at Georgetown, which provides information on all the technology tools and services you have available when teaching at Georgetown, including Blackboard, blogs, clickers, ePortfolios, and more.

    • Many faculty members are now integrating technologies to “flip the classroom”—to provide resources and information through tools outside of class and use class meetings to facilitate more active, hands-on learning. Our page on Teaching with Technologies offers tips on how to approach flipping your class.

    • Some faculty members are moving their classes fully or partially online through courses designed to be held in the online space; these courses may be fully online or blended, which include both online and face-to-face components. If you are considering moving part or all of your course online, you should begin by talking with your program or department chair to see whether this option will work within your program. You may also want to review our resources on Online Course Design to learn more about instructional considerations for these courses, as well as the resources CNDLS can offer for support.

    • CNDLS is pleased to be supporting two new technology tools that we anticipate will help faculty innovate their use of technologies in the classroom:

      • Canvas is a course management system that offers an alternative to Blackboard, offering ways for instructors to make content, activities, assessments, and communication tools available to students. We invite you to learn more about what Canvas offers, as well as your options for migrating to this system.

      • Domain of One’s Own is a hosting environment that gives students, faculty, and staff members personal domain names and web space to allow them to take ownership of their digital identities. When faculty integrate this tool into their classroom, both the faculty member and students can set up their own unique Georgetown domains, allowing each participant to construct and manage their web presence while at Georgetown. You can learn more about piloting this tool or using it in your classroom at Georgetown Domains.

    • If you are teaching foreign language at Georgetown and want to learn more about resources available to enhance your teaching, The Language Learning Technology (LLT) Center provides a variety of materials, services, and consulting support that promote the integration of technology into foreign language teaching and learning at Georgetown University.

    • There several Georgetown partners outside of CNDLS that can offer technology support, including:

    • You can learn what other Georgetown faculty are doing to promote technology-enhanced learning in their classes by visiting the ITEL website, which features all of the projects faculty have completed through this initiative, as well as the Prospect Blog. If you are interested in exploring grant opportunities for integrating technology into your classroom, we invite you to visit our ITEL pages and to stay tuned for announcements about our next round of ITEL awards.

  • What resources does CNDLS offer to support online learning?

    GeorgetownX represents the growing body of online courses that CNDLS facilitates, including our University partnership with edX and our collaborative work with departments and schools at Georgetown. We are committed to building unique, interactive courses that prioritize the student experience, taking advantage of emerging technologies to promote optimal learning in the online space. GeorgetownX supports a number of online programs and courses, with services customized to meet you and your students’ needs.

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    • CNDLS provides consultations and resources for individual faculty members to support their efforts in designing courses that are fully or partly online. If you are interested in moving a class online, we recommend that you begin by contacting your department chair to discuss opportunities for online teaching and learning within your program. As a next step, we invite you to visit our page on Online Course Design for much more information on how CNDLS can support this endeavor.

    • CNDLS also works with individual faculty members or faculty teams in the development of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). These courses are generally not targeted for Georgetown students, but instead appeal to a growing network of learners across the United States and around the world. MOOCs are an open platform for Georgetown faculty to share their expertise with a global audience and to innovate their teaching practices through creative applications of technology and media. We invite you to learn more about CNDLS’ process for developing MOOCs and to explore how you might get involved.

    • Finally, CNDLS works directly with program directors and administrators to design, develop, and implement online programs, some of which are for Georgetown students and others for an open, global network of participants. Georgetown’s online programs offer the same academic rigor as on-campus programs and provide online students with both student and academic services to support their learning. If you are considering launching a new or existing program online, we recommend that you begin by visiting Online@GU, where you will find step-by-step guidelines to help you through this process, with information on everything from strategic planning, compliance and GU governance, branding and marketing, enrollment management, student support, course development and implementation, technology integration, and data and analytics. Next, we invite you to visit our pages on Online Program Development to learn more about how CNDLS can support this process, as well as our approach to instructional design in the online space.

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    CNDLS Programs and Initiatives

  • What programs or initiatives does CNDLS offer that may help support my teaching?

    Whether you have been teaching for several years or are new to teaching in higher education, CNDLS offers a variety of services that can support your teaching. Many of our initiatives and programs are grounded in a foundational approach that emphasizes teaching to the whole person.

    READ MORE

    Regular events

    CNDLS hosts a number of regular events to support teaching and learning, all of which are open to anyone teaching at Georgetown, including full-time faculty, part-time faculty, and graduate students.

    • If you are a graduate student who is new to college teaching, consider our Apprentice in Teaching (AT) Program which is designed to enhance the preparation of graduate students as teachers. The AT program typically hosts about 10 workshops per semester. We invite you to view the current schedule for the upcoming semester’s workshops.

    • CNDLS offers our annual Teaching, Learning, and Innovation Summer Institute (TLISI), providing Georgetown faculty and graduate students with four days of workshops, seminars, and productive open design spaces (PODS) around topics of teaching and learning. We invite you to review the resources available from last year’s program, and to begin exploring the opportunities for your pedagogical development at the 2016 TLISI.

    • As part of the Engelhard Project for Connecting Life and Learning, this year we will host a series of speaking events titled “Engelhard Conversations on Educating the Whole Person.” These conversations typically feature scholars and experts on issues of student wellbeing, showcasing them in conversation with on-campus partners, faculty, staff, and students. To learn more about the conversation series, please visit the Engelhard page.

    Community-based programs and initiatives

    CNDLS manages several community-based programs and initiatives aimed at supporting faculty in their teaching. Many of the programs outlined below follow a cohort model that brings faculty members together to support one another in their professional development.

    • The Initiative on Technology-Enhanced Learning (ITEL) provides faculty the funding and support they need to bring technology-focused teaching and learning projects to life. ITEL serves as an incubator for boundary-pushing experiments as well as helps to facilitate the widespread adoption of promising technology-enhanced tools and approaches. To initiate an ITEL project, faculty submit grant proposals as part of the program’s open call. Stay tuned for more information on upcoming calls.

    • The Engelhard Project for Connecting Life and Learning focuses on teaching to the whole student. By incorporating health and wellness issues into the classroom, Engelhard faculty fellows use a curriculum infusion approach to foster academic learning and to encourage students to reflect on their own attitudes and behaviors. If you are interested in becoming an Engelhard faculty fellow, please contact the project team at cndls@georgetown.edu.

    • The Doyle Engaging Difference Program encourages Georgetown students and faculty to consider the value of difference and to engage it through enhanced learning opportunities inside and outside the classroom. This program is a campus-wide collaboration between the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) and Georgetown College. If you are interested in becoming a Doyle faculty fellow, please contact the project team at cndls@georgetown.edu.

    Grants available to enrich your teaching:

    There are several grant opportunities available through CNDLS that can support your teaching, including:

    • Curriculum Enrichment Grants support class-related activities that strengthen the intellectual climate around introductory-level undergraduate courses. These grants are intended to expose students to the larger community, bringing the curricular and co-curricular together to give students in introductory classes a richer sense of the applications of work in a given discipline. These grants can be used to fund field trips, performance attendance, lectures, cultural dinners, and other activities designed to foster dialogue inside and outside the classroom. All full-time and part-time faculty are eligible to apply for curriculum enrichment grants of up to $500.

    • Doyle Diversity Grants are meant to fund projects which help students engage with diversity or gain a greater recognition of their own positionality vis-a-vis issues of plurality and social justice. All full-time and part-time faculty are eligible to apply for Doyle grants of up to $500, with current and former Doyle faculty fellows receiving priority.

    • ITEL Grants support faculty members who want to implement large-scale experiments with technologies and pedagogical designs to improve teaching and learning, either at the course or curricular level. For each round of ITEL awards, CNDLS announces an open call inviting faculty to submit proposals. Stay tuned to the ITEL website for information on the upcoming open calls for the program.

  • Who at CNDLS can I meet with to discuss an issue with a course or program?

    CNDLS offers a variety of resources to support faculty development, including our comprehensive teaching handbook, the Teaching Commons; our annual four-day workshop series, the Teaching, Learning and Innovation Summer Institute (TLISI); and a variety of Assessment Services. However, if you need additional support around your teaching, or are interested in meeting to discuss a specific teaching issue, CNDLS is happy to offer individual consultations to all faculty (both full and part-time) and graduate students teaching at Georgetown.

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    • As you explore our resources, we also invite you to learn more about the varied expertise of our staff.

    • You can learn more about what other Georgetown faculty are doing to enhance teaching and learning in their classes through our Prospect Blog.

    • CNDLS works directly with program directors and administrators to design, develop, and implement online programs, some of which are for Georgetown students and others for an open, global network of participants. If you are considering launching a new or existing program online, we recommend that you begin by visiting Online@GU, where you will find step-by-step guidelines to help you through this process, with information on everything from strategic planning, compliance and GU governance, branding and marketing, enrollment management, student support, course development and implementation, technology integration, and data and analytics. Next, we invite you to visit our pages on Online Program Development to learn more about how CNDLS can support this process, as well as our approach to instructional design in the online space. You can contact us at cndls@georgetown.edu to set up an individual consultation.

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    Resources on SoTL

  • How can I find out more about research on the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), and how can I apply it in my classroom?

    In the changing landscape of teaching and learning in higher education, it is critical that faculty have access to the latest SoTL research to continually enhance their teaching practices. CNDLS regularly contributes to research in this field and can serve as a resource for faculty looking to apply SoTL research in their classrooms. We can also consult and/or partner with you as you contribute your own research to this growing field.

    READ MORE
    • CNDLS is home to the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) at Georgetown University, and we are engaged in advanced research on the pedagogical conditions and environments that best help students learn. Our research page includes recent research projects on ITEL and GeorgetownX, as well as thought papers written by CNDLS professional staff on forward-looking technologies and trends impacting the classroom. You can also find recent presentations and published work. Stay connected to CNDLS research, as well as the national conversation around SoTL via our CNDLS Twitter and Facebook pages, as well as our Prospect Blog, where we write about teaching and learning issues and events impacting Georgetown faculty and the larger landscape of teaching and learning in higher education.

    • An additional online teaching resource available to faculty is our Teaching Commons site, which is a robust repository of resources related to designing and teaching courses. For example, faculty who are looking for resources on how to effectively facilitate conversations around issues of difference and diversity in the classroom might find our page on difficult discussions helpful. The Teaching Commons also features a page on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning with links to several other resources that can help you get started exploring this type of research.

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    University Teaching Policies

  • What are some University teaching policies that I should be aware of as a faculty member or graduate student at Georgetown?

    As you prepare to teach at Georgetown, you may need to become familiar with particular university policies and requirements. The following list of resources may be helpful in connecting you to relevant university policies.

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    • The University Registrar provides Academic Calendars for all colleges and programs, as well as grading policies on deadlines and reporting, and information on course scheduling and classroom reservations.

    • The Georgetown University Faculty Handbook provides a comprehensive list of policies outlining the rights and responsibilities of faculty members, as approved by the Board of Directors. The document, provided online in its entirety, includes sections on University governance and organization, faculty policies and procedures, policies governing employment at Georgetown, benefits information, and other campus policies.

    • The liberal arts curriculum at Georgetown College is aimed at promoting particular skills of perception, analysis, interpretation, and expression, in order to sustain a life of curiosity, creativity, and responsiveness to the needs of both individuals and communities. You can find here a list of core requirements for undergraduate students at Georgetown College. The School of Foreign Service, The School of Nursing and Health Studies, and The McDonough School of Business each have their own core undergraduate curricula, with which you may want to become familiar.

    • When writing your course syllabi, you may need to be familiar with particular teaching policies at Georgetown. On our page on syllabus policies, you will find quotes from the official university policies (with hyperlinks to the original sources included), as well as some examples how Georgetown faculty have included this information on their syllabi.

    • One Georgetown policy with which you may want to become familiar is our policy on instructional continuity, which encourages faculty to be prepared to maintain instructional activities during unforeseen disruptions, such as weather emergencies or other incidences that may require campus to close. As you consider methods for implementing instructional continuity, you may also want to visit our page on Teaching and Learning Technologies: Tools and Services at Georgetown, which provides information on all the technology tools and services you have available when teaching at Georgetown. Many of these tools, such as e-learning management systems, lecture capture, and VoiceThread, among others, will help you maintain instruction when you and your students may not be on campus.

  • Does CNDLS offer resources to support the new diversity requirement at Georgetown?

    As part of a recent change to the university undergraduate curriculum, beginning in Fall 2016, all Georgetown students will take at least two courses that meet the requirements for “Engaging Diversity” by substantively engaging topics of diversity and difference. With many faculty and departments exploring ways to integrate themes of diversity and difference into the curriculum of existing courses, as well as to develop new courses to meet the goals of the requirement, CNDLS offers a number of resources on this topic.

    READ MORE
    • The Doyle Engaging Difference Program encourages Georgetown students and faculty to consider the value of difference and to engage it through enhanced learning opportunities inside and outside the classroom. This program is a campus-wide collaboration between the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) and Georgetown College. Having run the Doyle program since its inception in 2009, our CNDLS staff has now worked with 85 faculty members across 33 disciplines, facilitating 104 Doyle courses that served 2600 Georgetown students.

    • The Doyle Program also hosts its annual Doyle Engaging Difference Symposium, which creates an opportunity for our larger campus community — including alumni, current students, faculty, and staff — to engage in discussion and conversation about issues of diversity and difference on our campus, in our lives, and around the world. You can read briefs on the previous five years of Doyle Symposia at our website.

    • The Doyle Film and Culture Series presents several film and cultural performance events that raise issues related to diversity and difference. Through these campus-wide events, the Doyle Program hopes to create more opportunities to engage members of the Georgetown community in discussion and reflection about the benefits and challenges of today’s complex world.

    • Finally, Doyle Diversity Grants are meant to fund projects which help students engage with diversity or gain a greater recognition of their own positionality vis-a-vis issues of plurality and social justice. All full-time and part-time faculty are eligible to apply for Doyle grants of up to $500, with current and former Doyle faculty fellows receiving priority.

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    Services for Departments

  • What services does CNDLS offer to departments?

    While CNDLS often works directly with individual faculty members, we also work with departments to tailor our services to meet specific programmatic needs.

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    • CNDLS offers tailored workshops to department faculty on a variety of teaching and instructional topics. Past workshops have included:

      • Learning Goals and Developing Assignments
      • Facilitating Difficult Discussions
      • Using ePortfolios and Blogs
      • Designing Effective Online Discussions
      • Syllabus Design
      • Effective Classroom Interaction

      To talk with someone about developing a workshop that is right for your department contact us at cndls@georgetown.edu.

    • CNDLS works directly with program directors and administrators to design, develop, and implement online programs, some of which are for Georgetown students and others for an open, global network of participants. Georgetown’s online programs offer the same academic rigor as on-campus programs and provide online students with both student and academic services to support their learning. If you are considering launching a new or existing program online, we recommend that you begin by visiting Online@GU, where you will find step-by-step guidelines to help you through this process, with information on everything from strategic planning, compliance and GU governance, branding and marketing, enrollment management, student support, course development and implementation, technology integration, and data and analytics. Next, we invite you to visit our pages on Online Program Development to learn more about how CNDLS can support this process, as well as our approach to instructional design in the online space. You can contact us at cndls@georgetown.edu to set up an individual consultation.

    • We also work with departments to develop and implement student focus groups aimed at gathering information about particular aspects of the program. In preparing for the focus group, we help administrators develop a list of effective questions that will help generate open-ended discussion. Our CNDLS staff then meets with the focus group participants to facilitate the conversation and reports findings back to the department.

    • Finally, CNDLS often works with departments to create senior and alumni student surveys, which can help program administrators gather helpful information from the students who have completed the course of study. These larger programmatic evaluations can help departments better assess program goals, as well as to gather essential data on students’ job placements or other topics.

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